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PBS Show February 12-18, 2017, #2518

PBS Show February 12-18, 2017, #2518


– NARRATOR: The Texas Parks &
Wildlife television series
is funded in part by
a grant from the
Wildlife and Sport Fish
Restoration Program.
Through your purchases of
hunting and fishing equipment,
and motorboat fuels,
over 50 million dollars
in conservation efforts are
funded in Texas each year.
And by Texas Parks and
Wildlife Foundation.
Helping to keep Texas wild with
the support of proud members
across the state.Find out more at tpwf.orgAdditional funding provided
by Ram Trucks.
Guts.Glory.Ram.– NARRATOR: Coming up on
Texas Parks & Wildlife– We’re in South Texas,
five very distinct areas of the ranch that are very
different habitats. – Just seeing the joy and the
excitement on the kid’s face, it just, it lightens your heart. – For people that don’t come
from this when they come and see these big beautiful
pines, this beautiful oak and they just love it, they
just fall in love with it. – [theme music] ♪ ♪– NARRATOR:Texas Parks
& Wildlife,a television series
for all outdoors.
[music] – CHASE CURRIE: The San Pedro
is very beautiful it’s unique, majestic. It’s very atypical from
a habitat standpoint. There are so many different
plant species and so many different animal species. [bird chirping] I think a lot of people picture
South Texas as prickly pear and mesquite which in a lot
of cases it may be but I think that’s what makes
the San Pedro so beautiful in the fact that there’s a lot
of other ecological communities mixed in with prickly pear. – We’re in South Texas,
but from the highest point on the ranch, you can see
the Chihuahuan Desert. [coyote howls] So we have this unique Riparian
habitat in a very dry area. Then we have some very deep
open sand country and then we have the gravel
hills near the Rio Grande. Really five very distinct areas
of the ranch that are very different habitats. [splash] – CHASE: Oh! Did you get it? Did he catch something? [camera shutter] [film projector clicks] – JOSEPH: I think my grandfather
saw a very good opportunity. He bought it of course 1932. Some of the worst years
of the depression. And he had grown up ranching. He had, he was a real cowboy. – PAM HOWARD: Your first
memories of working on the ranch are being awakened at dawn and
your saddling up your horse and your helping to round up and
those are some of my earliest memories and it didn’t seem like
a lot of fun at the time but looking back, I wouldn’t
trade it for anything. [cows mooing] – [speaking Spanish] – CHASE: The San Pedro is a
working ranch. – 9 – 9 – 0! – CHASE: The income that is
generated is primarily through wildlife and cattle. Which we run a registered
Beefmaster cattle herd here. – DANIEL KUNZ: Cattle can be a
real asset to an operation even if you’re managing
for wildlife. It’s all in how you apply them. And the San Pedro Ranch
definitely uses them correctly.– NARRATOR: The brother and
sister team works hard to
benefit all wildlife and the
people who make up the
San Pedro Ranch.– JOSEPH: You know Daniel Boone
who recently retired, born and raised here. His father worked for my father
for many years and so we have a multi-generational culture here. [music] We each recognize what’s
important to the other about this ranch. And respect that.– NARRATOR: For Pam,
that’s butterflies.
For Joseph, it’s quail.And the once caliche pit,
turned into a wetland
hosts plenty of plants that
benefit both species.
– CHASE: This is Rio Grande
Clammyweed which is actually a pollinator plant but also
really good quail plant. – Quail don’t eat butterflies,
do they? – No. – Oh good. Ok. [laughs] That just dawned on me. – KAREN: But do quail eat
butterflies? – CHASE: Absolutely. Yea. [laughs] – I didn’t want to tell
her that they did so now that she knows from
Chase that they do, the solution is plenty
of butterflies. [birds chirping]– NARRATOR: Along with
increasing butterfly habitat,
are a host of other projects
from building a wetland,
planting native grasses over
old pipelines,
setting up artificial
turkey roosts,
and the restoration
of a creek.
– And so it’s really interesting
work and they’re really doing a great job in restoring
the Riparian areas. [music]– NARRATOR: And finally, the
addition of a conservation
easement to make sure the
ranch stays the way it is
for future generations.[dogs play] – JOSEPH: The land doesn’t
know your intentions. It doesn’t know the laws and it
doesn’t know the regulations. The land only knows the results. And if your results are good
and move you towards a stable, diverse, native habitat,
then that’s good. But all the intentions in the
world won’t make that happen. It requires active management. And that’s, in a nutshell,
our philosophy. [music] [laughs] – MICHAEL HOMER: Compared to a
lot of people, I’ve had a pretty nontraditional
outdoors background. I grew up in metro Atlanta. I was born in New York, so I
never really went fishing, but I was always outdoorsy with
my friends in the neighborhood. I really think it
started from that. I recognized that being
outdoors, I felt connected. My name is Michael Homer. Nice to meet you, Patrick. Well, I certainly appreciate
your service, and thank you for being out here
and volunteering today. [ducks quacking] The fish are going to be
clustered with plants, and there’s nowhere to go. All right, folks, if you are
volunteering for the Texas Parks and Wildlife today, if you
can kind of meet over here… – We’ve partnered with
Parks and Wildlife, Texas Parks and Wildlife,
to develop a neighborhood fishing program here on one
of our smaller ponds, and that’s been very successful. – NATALIE GOLDSTROHM: It’s a
huge collaboration with all kinds of outdoor
recreational groups. We’ve invited anybody that’s
interested in coming and learning about fishing
to come on out. – MAN: Who wants to put
their own bait on? – MICHAEL: Trying to instill
conservation beliefs of, you know, preservation and
protecting species, it all goes into teaching kids how to fish. It’s part of the earth. It’s life. It makes you feel alive. Here you go. Oh, I gave you one already. There you go. Have y’all ever heard of
crappie? Never heard of a crappie? – NATALIE: Just seeing the joy
and the excitement on the kid’s face, it just, you know,
it lightens your heart. Mike has been the reason that
a lot of those kids have those first fish smile moments. – MICHAEL: And how do you know
it’s a catfish? Because of his whiskers? Well, I tell you what,
you’re absolutely right. – NATALIE: He really built a
strong case as to why Abilene needed a community fishing lake,
because they didn’t have one. – MICHAEL: I do what I do
because I love it. I love it because I want to be
a steward, and I’ve seen that from a lot of my peers within
Parks and Wildlife. There are a lot of very talented
people in this agency that do a lot for their community. It’s humbling. I don’t know if you’ve seen
any cod since you’ve been over here, but… – RICHARD: Michael and his staff
are willing to just do whatever needs to be done. They seem to love kids and love
to introduce kids to fishing. – Let’s go! Come on! I’ve got it! – NATALIE: He’s built tons of
connections within the community and I think that that’s the
biggest thing, because without the support of the community,
the program wouldn’t be nearly as successful. – MICHAEL: We are in a
vocational position where it’s not a job to us, it’s a service
that’s needed to society. Just speaking from the
perspective of being a dad, reaching out to a kid whose mind
is like a sponge, if you can get them hooked on nature,
they’re more likely to care about it as they get older. Being able to pass that
feeling on has been wonderful. [music] [soothing guitar music] [soothing guitar music] – KODY WATERS: For people that
don’t come from this when they come and see these big beautiful
pines, this beautiful oak and they just love it, they
just fall in love with it. I was actually raised in this
area and this is what I like. I don’t like where I can see,
you can see forever in west Texas. Here you can’t see very far.– NARRATOR: About as far up in
northeast Texas as you can go
is Atlanta State Park.The park is 1,500 acres of
rolling hills and towering trees
hugging the southern shoreline
of Lake Wright Patman.
– KODY: Inside the park we have
a mixture of native trees, mixed with hardwood, a lot of
red oak and pine, water oak, white oak, pin oak, lot of
different type of oak here and it’s all native. [water splashing]– NARRATOR: The Caddo Indians
lived and farmed here
long before Anglo settlers
arrived.
– KODY: We are probably about
15 miles from where the Sulphur River feeds into
the Red River. The water supply was right here. They weren’t nomadic Indians. They could stay here and farm
and then they could go downriver and trade, then
come right back up. [water splashing]– NARRATOR: Where the Sulphur
River once meandered through,
there is now a
20,000-acre reservoir,
and it’s full of fish.– ALEX MITCHAM: Catfish! [splashing] – KODY: It’s a great white perch
lake, a great catfish lake. It’s not really a big bass lake. But as far as catfish and
perch and white crappie. I would say it’s one of the best
in the state. I would put if up against
any other lake. – There you go girl.
Good job! – WILLIAM MITCHAM: This lake’s
got a lot of fish in it. – ALEX: Three catfish
and a drum. – WILLIAM: We mainly come down
here to help fill the freezer up and have fun doing it. – ALEX: That little,
we don’t keep em. [splashing]– NARRATOR: The changing seasons
at Atlanta State Park
draw visitors year round.In fall, the forest sparkles
with shades of yellow and red.
Dogwood blooms announce
the arrival of spring.
In summer, cool lake breezes and
shade from the towering trees
help make Atlanta State Park
a relaxing place
to pass the time.– KODY: Picture yourself just
walking down the trail and you’ve got 80 to
90-foot pine trees and 80 to 90-foot hardwoods
on both sides of you. It is beautiful. You can come here and
you can be relaxed. You can come to get away,
and be quiet and peaceful. [music] – Alright Clevlens, let’s make
history all over again. Come on, here we go.– NARRATOR: The Clevlen family
is recreating a photo taken
50 years ago.Joan Engen got the surprise of
her life one morning when she
logged on to a local news site.– There was this picture
of my brothers and I. I was like, oh my gosh! What is this doing here?– NARRATOR: The picture was part
of Texas Parks and Wildlife’s
50th anniversary celebration.– First of all, I was just
totally shocked to see the picture.– NARRATOR: Then the memories
came flooding back.
– JOAN: My father was a
traveling salesman for Merck and mom would bring all five
of us kids up here and we would stay up here
by ourselves with mom and we just literally just lived
out here for a month at a time. – The memories for us as kids
and being boys, you know, it was just an awesome summer
being able to do whatever you wanted to do, get up
every morning and go fishing. You could fish all day long. When you get tired of
fishing you go swimming. It was a great summer. You didn’t want to go home for
any reason because you had everything up here
that you loved doing.– NARRATOR: And it was one of
those happy summer days that
a Texas Parks and Wildlife
photographer
snapped the picture.– CHASE: I want y’all to try
to recreate that photo if at all possible.– NARRATOR: Fifty years later,
another Parks and Wildlife
photographer asked if they
would do it all again.
– Recreating the footsteps
of another photographer with Parks and Wildlife
was a big thrill for me, something I really wanted to do. One more, here we go! 1, 2, 3 and smile, smile, smile! If you look at the photo from
50 years ago, all of them look so happy and like they get along
and they just connect well with one another. And if you flash forward
50 years, they look exactly the same way as they did
in the pictures back then.– NARRATOR: The close-knit
siblings still enjoy spending
time together outdoors.– …Mom’s station wagon and
that buzzard! – CHASE: I think their good
relationship they have now is as a result of the years they
spent visiting state parks.– NARRATOR: To help more
families enjoy the outdoors,
Texas State Parks offer
Outdoor Family Workshops.
– RANGER: You’re gonna get
two poles…– NARRATOR: Folks who have never
camped before get to experience
the great outdoors without
spending a lot of money.
– We provide all the gear,
the tent, the stove, cook sets, utensils. We provide air mattresses for
the adults so you don’t have to wake up with creaky bones. Only thing they have to bring
is their food and their sleeping bag or blankets and
we provide everything else.– NARRATOR: For the Clevlen
kids, Inks Lake State Park
holds a special place in
their hearts.
Theirparents’ ashes
are sprinkled there.
– MARK: After coming up here
it’s like, hey, we need to get back to doing this again. You know our lives are so busy
now but just coming up here today it’s been great
bringing back the memories. [boat motor revs]– NARRATOR: Clancy Terrill and
his friend, Richard Burrage…
– Not finding any?– NARRATOR: …are chasing
cats–
– No.– NARRATOR: Catfish, that is —
all around Lake Buchanan.
[crickets chirping]Though their day began
awfully early…
– Watch your head. –…it also started slowly.– CLANCY: C’mon fish.– NARRATOR: There has
been a bite or two…
– CLANCY: There he is.– NARRATOR: And there has been
some good-natured ribbing…
– CLANCY: You jerked it
like a girl! RICHARD: No!– NARRATOR: …but so far there
haven’t been many catfish.
[catfish croaking]
– RICHARD: He’s talking to you. – CLANCY: Nice little blue.
See how pretty they are?– NARRATOR: It’s the big ones…that Clancy is known
for catching.
– I guide for trophy catfish. [splash]– NARRATOR: In order to
attract these fish…
– Anchors aweigh.– NARRATOR: …some 40 feet
down Clancy and Richard
serve up a variety
of smelly baits.
– My wife says, “I can tell
when you’ve been catfishing.” [chuckles] [reel whirring] – RICHARD: Alright, there’s one.– NARRATOR: The fresh shad
seem more attractive
to another fish today.– CLANCY: Oh, it’s a striper.– NARRATOR: Clancy guides
for striped bass as well.
– CLANCY: That’s good, Richard. That’s about a three
to four year striper. If you can get the stripers
out of your way, you’ll probably catch
some catfish. [music] – RICHARD: Catfish are
going to be next. – CLANCY: Get him, Richard.– NARRATOR: With some
persistence, Clancy and Richard
find what they’ve been
fishing for.
– CLANCY: Catfish! [fish croaks] [music] – Woohoo! It ain’t big fish,
but it’s something. [splashes]– NARRATOR: And they’ll be
back to catch the big one
another day.– CLANCY: It’s just a lot
of fun. – RICHARD: Especially
if it’s a big one. [boat revving]– NARRATOR: While some folks
just enjoy catching catfish,
others will literally
line up to eat them.
– MAN: We got the catfish. I think it’s worth the wait. Let’s see. There you go! – Catfish is a great fish. – Mmmm. That’s good. [zydeco music]– NARRATOR: One weekend
each Fall,
the Conroe Cajun Catfish
Festival turns Conroe,
just north of Houston,
into a capital of zydeco music
and all things catfish.– Woooaaahhh! Gotta go, gotta go, gotta go! – KEITH MILLER: It’s about
everybody coming downtown and enjoying the catfish
and all the food vendors and all the great Cajun
music, and everybody having a good time. – CARL BOSTICK: Right now,
well you know, catfish is a year-round thing.– NARRATOR: The festival is also
a chance for local fishing
guides, like Carl Bostick,
to meet a few new customers,
and show off some
Lake Conroe catfish.
– We get asked every year
to come in and bring some fish and the kids love it. You can’t keep their hands out
of the water where the fish are. – Whoa! That scared me…– NARRATOR: Soon after the
festival, Carl is back
on Lake Conroe…– CARL: I think it’s the best
catfish lake in the state.– NARRATOR: …Not with
clients but with friends.
– CARL: That’s what I
do on my days off.– NARRATOR: The two boats are
out for an evening
of jug fishing.– Jugging, you’re increasing
your odds a whole lot because you can put up to
five hooks on a jug, and, depending on how many
people you have out there, you could have hundreds
of hooks work an area. – MORRIS: Fish it. [splash] [GPS beeps] – The GPS is really nice-
great little tool for us to track where we put them,
and find each jug.– NARRATOR: Even the jugs
themselves have gone high tech.
– MORRIS: These are what
we call flagging jugs. Whenever a fish pulls on
the line, he’ll slide the counter-weight to the bottom,
and then we know it has a fish on it or
something’s hit it. DONALD: Toss it, Steven.– NARRATOR: By the time the
boats have anchored all their
hooks in the water…[GPS beep] DONALD: That’s all of them.– NARRATOR: Some of the jugs
have already flagged.
– DONALD: There’s one
back to our left. – STEVEN: Yeah, he’s on here. [fish netting] There you go. – DONALD: Nice little blue cat.– NARRATOR: Catfish are
caught…
hooks are re-baited…and jugs are returned.[splash]The circuit continues non-stop.And as night falls,
the ice chest fills.
[zydeco music] – DONALD: If you want to
make a fish haul, jugging’s a way of doing it.– NARRATOR: Jugging is also a
good way to find the big cats.
– I think we have a
decent fish coming up here.– NARRATOR: Pulling in a
large catfish can require
a little bit of teamwork.– MORRIS: You’ve got about
a 20-pounder, coming up. That’s it. [struggles and groans] – WAYNE SAUNDERS: It’s just fun
to come out and see how many of the big ones you can catch. – MORRIS: How much does
he weigh, George? – GEORGE: I don’t know. [laughs] – We really enjoy it.– NARRATOR: The thrill of
catching a trophy fish
does not require keeping it.– GEORGE: Twenty-eight,
twenty-six four. – WAYNE: Take a picture of
him and turn him loose. Let him grow. Maybe next year he’ll
weigh five more pounds.– NARRATOR: So Morris, Wayne and
George have their own policy
regarding these big and
most-productive fish.
[camera click]They keep only a photo…[straining and laughter]– …and they keep
a good story, too.
– WAYNE: They wanna twist when
they get in that water. – MORRIS: Well that’s a good
start for the evening. – GEORGE: [sighs] Yeah.– NARRATOR: Increasing interest
in catching catfish
in large numbers or sizes
has also increased the need
for studying catfish.– DAVE BUCKMEIER: As the
interests change, obviously the management
has to change. – MAN: C’mon fishies,
c’mon little fishies.– NARRATOR: Nearby on
Lake Livingston
biologists are learning
how to measure populations
of catfish species,
more accurately.
– WARREN SCHLECHTE: It does
get fairly fast-paced. I’ve frequently heard
it referred to as a rodeo kind of collection. – Up front,
front right, Dave. – DAVE: As you pump
electricity into the water, it ends up stunning fish. This has been known
for a long time, poachers did it in the past. We can do it legally,
whereas others can’t. It’s a very efficient method. We needed thousands of fish to
be collected, tagged, and then released to get the
answers we were looking for. – 399. – Got it. – WARREN: The marking was
specific to certain fin clip combinations, so when we
recaptured the fish we could tell where that fish came from. A few fish were kept
for some other samples, for aging and those
kinds of things. – 798. – WARREN: Ultimately standard
sampling protocols will be developed from that.– NARRATOR: As biologists get
a better picture of catfish
populations in reservoirs and
rivers, they can better
keep catfish healthy,
and anglers happy.
– Whether you want to take some
fish home to eat or whether you want to try and catch a
trophy, that’s kind of the goal in all of it is to make sure
those opportunities are there for everyone,
across the state. – BRETT: Mine’s bigger. – CARL: I don’t know,
mine’s bigger.– NARRATOR: That means Carl and
his friends should always
be able to go fishing for cats.– We got us a cat fight
going on! [laughs] – If I can be on this water,
I’m gonna be on this water, whether it’s a job or not,
I’m gonna be fishing. – MORRIS: Oooh boy. You got another nice one. [splashing] [George straining]– NARRATOR: Whether on a hook…– A little bit of a workout. –…on the menu,
or on their own.
There is just something
fun about catfish.
– CARL: I’ve always
been a cat fisherman. You know, they say we’re a breed
of our own, and everybody has their favorites, but on
this lake that would be mine. – GEORGE: He’s not very
happy about all this. – MORRIS: Thirty-five? That’s a pretty one. Okay. – CARL: I love it. [splash] [wind, soft music] [wind, soft music] [wind, soft music] [wind, soft music] [wind, soft music] [wind, soft music] [soft music] [soft music] [soft music] [soft music] [soft music] [soft music] [soft music] [soft music]– NARRATOR: This series is
funded in part by a grant
from the Wildlife and Sport
Fish Restoration Program.
Through your purchases of
hunting and fishing equipment,
and motorboat fuels,
over 50 million dollars in
conservation efforts are
funded in Texas each year.
And by Texas Parks and
Wildlife Foundation.
Helping to keep Texas wild with
the support of proud members
across the state.Find out more at tpwf.orgAdditional funding
provided by Ram Trucks.
Guts.Glory.

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